Syntrix Consulting Epic Certified Consultants
Request a Consultation

Healthcare Business Intelligence

Understanding Unstructured Data (Part Two)

Posted by Ron Stephenson

Jul 13, 2016 12:30:00 PM



In a previous blog, I wrote about unstructured data in the healthcare industry and EHR systems. Unstructured data can consist of explanations of benefits, audio voice dictations, handwritten and typewritten notes, diagnostic images, e-mail messages and attachments, text messages, medical claims and more. Although it can sometimes be hard to access programmatically, unstructured data often includes information that is a valuable part of a patient’s medical record and clinical history.

Again, by being able to analyze unstructured data along with its structured counterpart, clinicians can provide a more complete picture of a patient’s history, diagnosis, treatment and outcome. It can help maintain data consistency, allow for combined qualitative and quantitative data and can  be highly valuable when used in a research capacity.

When properly captured into a data structure or application, unstructured data can be effectively utilized through:

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

Understanding Unstructured Data (Part One)

Posted by Ron Stephenson

Jul 12, 2016 12:30:00 PM



According to analysts from Merrill Lynch, Gartner and IBM, unstructured data accounts for approximately 80 percent of the data in business organizations. Similarly, the Health Story Project estimates that 1.2 billion clinical documents are produced in the U.S. each year with about 60 percent containing valuable patient care information in an unstructured format.

So what exactly is unstructured data? It’s the kind of data that usually has to be captured, read and analyzed by a person instead of a machine and is stored as free text, making it difficult for processing by a computer. In the healthcare industry, unstructured data includes explanations of benefits, audio voice dictations, handwritten and typewritten notes, diagnostic images, e-mail messages and attachments, text messages, medical claims and more. Radiology reports are responsible for a vast amount of unstructured data.

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

Cybercrime in Healthcare: Statistics

Posted by Jean-Luc Coquerel

Jul 11, 2016 12:30:00 PM



Cybercrime continues to be a big issue across many industries, and healthcare is one of its  biggest targets. Even as cybersecurity measures have improved, the threat to healthcare data is big. Cybersecurity is the state of being protected against the criminal or unauthorized use of electronic data and the measures taken to defend against attacks. The following statistics show how the healthcare industry has been affected by cybercrime:

  • A rise in cyber attacks against doctors and hospitals is costing the U.S. healthcare system $6 billion a year.
  • A 2014 industry benchmarking report ranked healthcare's cybersecurity preparedness behind that of the finance, retail and energy industries.
  • The cost of a cyberattack for the average hospital is $3.5 million, but according to a HIMSS survey, 46 percent of hospitals spend less than $500,000 annually on cybersecurity. 
  • Approximately 88 percent of CIOs and CISOs have reported increased cybersecurity budgets in recent years.
Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

mHealth: How Mobile Health Enhances Healthcare

Posted by Jean-Luc Coquerel

Jul 8, 2016 12:30:00 PM



Technology is utilized by many industries, and healthcare is no different. The introduction of smartphones and other mobile devices has spurred the growth of technology in healthcare. A rapidly growing area of healthcare technology is mHealth, or mobile healthcare. What is mHealth?  Below are definitions from leading health organizations about mHealth.  

Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH) - mHealth is the delivery of healthcare services via mobile communication devices.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) - mHealth is the use of mobile and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, healthcare services and health research.

World Health Organization (WHO) - mHealth is an area of electronic health (eHealth), and it is the provision of health services and information via mobile technologies such as mobile phones and Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs).

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

Utilizing Technology to Achieve Improved Quality of Care

Posted by Ron Stephenson

Jul 7, 2016 12:30:00 PM



Healthcare providers across the country are continually focused on quality improvement. The U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration defines quality improvement as systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvement in healthcare services and the overall health of targeted patient groups. Furthermore, U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration defines quality improvement as systematic and continuous actions that lead to measurable improvement in healthcare services and the overall health of targeted patient groups's a direct correlation between the level of improved health services and the desired health outcomes of individuals and populations.

The National Quality Forum (NQF) notes that studies have indicated that American adults receive recommended care only about 55 percent of the time and that 30 percent of healthcare spending is wasteful and produces no value to the patient. The organization highlights the four key principles of a successful quality improvement program as QI work as systems and processes, focus on patients, focus on being part of the team and focus on use of the data.

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

Cybersecurity in Healthcare

Posted by Ron Stephenson

Jul 6, 2016 12:30:00 PM



The use of technology in healthcare has produced many benefits, but it also presents some risks. One of the biggest risks healthcare organizations face using technology to gather patient data is a data breach. Five of the eight largest healthcare cybersecurity breaches since 2010 occurred in 2015, making healthcare the top industry for cyberattacks. 

So what can be done to prevent security breaches in healthcare? Many healthcare organizations are looking to cybersecurity to help protect their data. Cybersecurity is the state of being protected against the criminal or unauthorized use of electronic data or the measures taken to achieve this. The United States government passed the Cybersecurity Act of 2015 to give companies the ability to share cybersecurity information with federal agencies while providing liability protection and antitrust exemption for those sharing information.

The State of Cybersecurity in Healthcare Organizations in 2016” report released by ESET® noted that only half of healthcare organizations have an incident response plan in place in the case of a data breach, even though the healthcare industry experiences at least one cyberattack per month. According to the PwC Health Research Institute, preventive cybersecurity costs approximately $8 per patient record, while the estimated cost of a major breach is $200 per record.

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

Healthcare and Cloud Computing: Access the Advantages

Posted by Jean-Luc Coquerel

Jul 5, 2016 12:30:00 PM



Use of cloud computing has been common in many industries over a decade, but the healthcare industry was slow to embrace it. That changed, though, as healthcare organizations started implementing plans to meet guidelines for the financial incentive programs from the HITECH Act. According to a HIMSS Analytics Cloud Survey, 80 percent of healthcare organization respondents report that they use cloud services, and a report from research firm MarketsandMarkets forecasts the healthcare cloud market to grow to $6.5 billion by 2018.

In this first of two blogs on cloud computing in healthcare, we’ll discuss the benefits it brings to healthcare. The next blog will focus on tips for transitioning to the cloud.

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

Healthcare and Cloud Computing: Six Steps for Success

Posted by Jean-Luc Coquerel

Jul 1, 2016 12:30:00 PM



Although the healthcare industry was initially slow to embrace cloud computing, providers are transitioning to it at a rapid pace. In our most recent blog, we examined a variety of benefits healthcare organizations can achieve by using cloud technology. This blog will focus on the steps healthcare organizations should take to make their move to the cloud a success.

Moving to cloud computing typically requires less resources for healthcare organizations compared to implementing a new IT system on site. However, it’s important to follow certain steps to ensure the transition is done correctly. Otherwise, some of the benefits of utilizing cloud technology may not be achieved, and providers may end up with unnecessary problems.

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

How Healthcare Analytics Can Boost Operating Room Efficiency

Posted by Ron Stephenson

Jun 30, 2016 12:30:00 PM



Consider the following statistics from Becker's ASC Review:

  • The total operating expenses per operating room (OR) is $1.2 million.
  • 765 cases are performed per OR annually, with 4.6 cases per day.
  • Median operating room time per patient encounter is 50.2 minutes. 

It should not be a surprise that many hospital ORs do not operate at the highest level of efficiency. Producing the desired outcomes with minimum waste of time, effort and skill is often the biggest challenge perioperative service areas face in the hospital. Surgeons, nurses and staff are busy tending to patients and have to coordinate with other physicians and clinicians to schedule time in the OR. Hospital administrators and leadership are often looking for ways to improve efficiency and increase revenue through their organization’s ORs. Just as healthcare analytics bring focused data to other areas of a healthcare organization, they can (and should), be applied to optimize performance in the OR.

Read More

Topics: Healthcare Analytics

EHR Adoption Fun Facts: Learning More about EHRs and Epic

Posted by Jean-Luc Coquerel

Jun 29, 2016 12:30:00 PM



The world of healthcare IT can sometimes be overwhelming, especially with the development of so many new technologies and products. Healthcare organizations strive to achieve important patient care goals while complying with an array of government regulations. For a lighter note, this blog includes some lesser known facts about EHRs along with interesting notes on Epic Systems, one of the leaders in EHR systems.

EHR Facts:

  • The first EHRs appeared in the 1960s.
  • The Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, was one of the first major systems to adopt an EHR.
  • Epic, MEDITECH and Cerner comprise nearly 60% of the market share of primary certified EHRs for participating hospitals.
Read More

Topics: EMR Reporting

Contact Us

Questions? Feel free to call or email us.

  877-SYNTRIX (796-8749)

  info@syntrixconsulting.com

  965 Oakland Road | Suite 3A | Lawrenceville, Georgia 30044